Video 14 Jul 1 note

#credence

(Source: youtube.com)

Photo 13 Jul 3 notes Petrarubbia 03
Detail of The Pietrarubbia Group: il fondamento, l’uso, il rapporto (1975–76) by italian sculptor Arnaldo Pomodoro (b. 1926), in the collection of the Storm King Art Center, New York. 
Pomodoro has described The Pietrarubbia Group as “a vision of an archaic settlement.” With its visual references to ancient burial traditions and hieroglyphics, the work commemorates the history and crumbling beauty of the nearly abandoned village for which it is named. The Pietrarubbia Group comprises a patio upon which stand two grand, slab-like bronze doors that visitors can move, providing access to the work’s interior. Expansive areas of the doors and the wall beyond them are incised with patterns that resemble ancient signs or writing, giving symbolic voice to the forgotten society that once occupied Pietrarubbia. The first line of Eugenio Montale’s poem Lo sai <You know) is inscribed on one of the doors:
Lo sai: debbo riperderti e non posso (“You know: I must lose you again, and I cannot”)

Petrarubbia 03

Detail of The Pietrarubbia Group: il fondamento, l’uso, il rapporto (1975–76) by italian sculptor Arnaldo Pomodoro (b. 1926), in the collection of the Storm King Art Center, New York.

Pomodoro has described The Pietrarubbia Group as “a vision of an archaic settlement.” With its visual references to ancient burial traditions and hieroglyphics, the work commemorates the history and crumbling beauty of the nearly abandoned village for which it is named. The Pietrarubbia Group comprises a patio upon which stand two grand, slab-like bronze doors that visitors can move, providing access to the work’s interior. Expansive areas of the doors and the wall beyond them are incised with patterns that resemble ancient signs or writing, giving symbolic voice to the forgotten society that once occupied Pietrarubbia. The first line of Eugenio Montale’s poem Lo sai <You know) is inscribed on one of the doors:

Lo sai: debbo riperderti e non posso (“You know: I must lose you again, and I cannot”)

Photo 13 Jul 1 note Pietrarubbia 02
Detail of The Pietrarubbia Group: il fondamento, l’uso, il rapporto (1975–76) by italian sculptor Arnaldo Pomodoro (b. 1926), in the collection of the Storm King Art Center, New York.
Pomodoro has described The Pietrarubbia Group as “a vision of an archaic settlement.” With its visual references to ancient burial traditions and hieroglyphics, the work commemorates the history and crumbling beauty of the nearly abandoned village for which it is named. The Pietrarubbia Group comprises a patio upon which stand two grand, slab-like bronze doors that visitors can move, providing access to the work’s interior. Expansive areas of the doors and the wall beyond them are incised with patterns that resemble ancient signs or writing, giving symbolic voice to the forgotten society that once occupied Pietrarubbia. The first line of Eugenio Montale&#8217;s poem Lo sai &lt;You know) is inscribed on one of the doors:
Lo sai: debbo riperderti e non posso (“You know: I must lose you again, and I cannot”)

Pietrarubbia 02

Detail of The Pietrarubbia Group: il fondamento, l’uso, il rapporto (1975–76) by italian sculptor Arnaldo Pomodoro (b. 1926), in the collection of the Storm King Art Center, New York.

Pomodoro has described The Pietrarubbia Group as “a vision of an archaic settlement.” With its visual references to ancient burial traditions and hieroglyphics, the work commemorates the history and crumbling beauty of the nearly abandoned village for which it is named. The Pietrarubbia Group comprises a patio upon which stand two grand, slab-like bronze doors that visitors can move, providing access to the work’s interior. Expansive areas of the doors and the wall beyond them are incised with patterns that resemble ancient signs or writing, giving symbolic voice to the forgotten society that once occupied Pietrarubbia. The first line of Eugenio Montale’s poem Lo sai <You know) is inscribed on one of the doors:

Lo sai: debbo riperderti e non posso (“You know: I must lose you again, and I cannot”)

Photo 13 Jul 15 notes Pietrarubbia 01
Detail of The Pietrarubbia Group: il fondamento, l’uso, il rapporto (1975–76) by italian sculptor Arnaldo Pomodoro (b. 1926), in the collection of the Storm King Art Center, New York.
Pomodoro has described The Pietrarubbia Group as “a vision of an archaic settlement.” With its visual references to ancient burial traditions and hieroglyphics, the work commemorates the history and crumbling beauty of the nearly abandoned village for which it is named. The Pietrarubbia Group comprises a patio upon which stand two grand, slab-like bronze doors that visitors can move, providing access to the work’s interior. Expansive areas of the doors and the wall beyond them are incised with patterns that resemble ancient signs or writing, giving symbolic voice to the forgotten society that once occupied Pietrarubbia. The first line of Eugenio Montale&#8217;s poem Lo sai &lt;You know) is inscribed on one of the doors:
Lo sai: debbo riperderti e non posso (“You know: I must lose you again, and I cannot”)

Pietrarubbia 01

Detail of The Pietrarubbia Group: il fondamento, l’uso, il rapporto (1975–76) by italian sculptor Arnaldo Pomodoro (b. 1926), in the collection of the Storm King Art Center, New York.

Pomodoro has described The Pietrarubbia Group as “a vision of an archaic settlement.” With its visual references to ancient burial traditions and hieroglyphics, the work commemorates the history and crumbling beauty of the nearly abandoned village for which it is named. The Pietrarubbia Group comprises a patio upon which stand two grand, slab-like bronze doors that visitors can move, providing access to the work’s interior. Expansive areas of the doors and the wall beyond them are incised with patterns that resemble ancient signs or writing, giving symbolic voice to the forgotten society that once occupied Pietrarubbia. The first line of Eugenio Montale’s poem Lo sai <You know) is inscribed on one of the doors:

Lo sai: debbo riperderti e non posso (“You know: I must lose you again, and I cannot”)

Photo 13 Jul Murray Hill skyline
The black tower on the right is 101 Park Ave, a 49-floor building that opened in 1982 and has featured in several movies. It&#8217;s biggest claim to fame is perhaps to have been shown as the site of George Costanza&#8217;s office in an episode of &lt;i&gt;Seinfeld&lt;/i&gt;. The other black tower, slightly shorter at 41 floors is 90 Park Avenue, originally known as the Sterling Drug Company building, from 1966. It was designed by the office of Emery Roth and Sons, which produced numerous of buildings of this type in midtown-Manhattan. 

Murray Hill skyline

The black tower on the right is 101 Park Ave, a 49-floor building that opened in 1982 and has featured in several movies. It’s biggest claim to fame is perhaps to have been shown as the site of George Costanza’s office in an episode of <i>Seinfeld</i>. The other black tower, slightly shorter at 41 floors is 90 Park Avenue, originally known as the Sterling Drug Company building, from 1966. It was designed by the office of Emery Roth and Sons, which produced numerous of buildings of this type in midtown-Manhattan. 

Photo 13 Jul The church of bling

The church of bling

Photo 13 Jul Glass houses

Glass houses

Photo 13 Jul Free expertise 
Detail of Our Lady of Mercy&#8221;. The curators of the Museu de São Roque wouldn&#8217;t say more than it&#8217;s Portuguese, from the early 16th century, but there is consensus among internet experts that at least parts of it are by Paula Rego.

Free expertise

Detail of Our Lady of Mercy”. The curators of the Museu de São Roque wouldn’t say more than it’s Portuguese, from the early 16th century, but there is consensus among internet experts that at least parts of it are by Paula Rego.

Photo 12 Jul The tower room
The Tower Room at the former offices of Bergen electrical power company, now one of the buildings (Lysverket) of the Art Museums of Bergen. The building, which is from 1938, was designed by architects Fredrik Arnesen (1879–1963) and Arthur Darre Kaarbø (1881–1948).

The tower room

The Tower Room at the former offices of Bergen electrical power company, now one of the buildings (Lysverket) of the Art Museums of Bergen. The building, which is from 1938, was designed by architects Fredrik Arnesen (1879–1963) and Arthur Darre Kaarbø (1881–1948).

Photo 9 Jul The fourth wall

The fourth wall


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